Wake Up, Philippines!

Fibers for health

Posted in Diseases/Disabilities, Health, Nutrition by Erineus on July 15, 2009

July 13, 2009, 5:29pm

Aside from celebrating Nutrition month this July, we also celebrate diabetes awareness week. In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that there are around 171 million people worldwide who suffer from this illness. For the year 2030, WHO has further estimated that, worldwide, diabetes could afflict 360 million people, 1/3 of which may come from the Southeast Asia Region. In the Philippines alone, people with diabetes can reach an estimated number of 7.7 million.

While diabetes can be hereditary, a type of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with active lifestyle and proper diet. But for most adults, having an active lifestyle and maintaining proper diet is really very difficult. This is because of the ever increasing time of inactivity among adults. On a conservative estimate, an adult can have at least 18 hours of inactive periods in a day. Well, it’s so easy to say: “then, there’s still six hours a day to be active”, but not most offices have their mini gymnasium for their employees, and in this time of crisis, to spend for gym memberships wouldn’t be that easy to include in the family budget. Oh yes, a walk in the city’s park or open-to-public university campuses would be an option where to walk, run, bike or play, but not too many could really have this done. With many people becoming inactive, we can really come close to the estimated number diabetics in our country alone. We should really exert effort to make our bodies physically active as it can be.

As always mentioned, having a high-fiber diet is another means to prevent diabetes. For you to have more idea as to what fiber your purchased products contain, here are different types of fibers that you can look for from the label’s ingredient lines:

Cellulose, a principal component of the cell wall of most plants and is therefore present in fruits, vegetables and cereals. Much of the fiber in cereal bran is cellulose. Cellulose forms about one quarter of the dietary fibre in grains and fruit and one third in vegetables and nuts.

Hemicellulose/s are polysaccharides that contain sugars other than glucose, and are associated with cellulose in plant cell walls. Approximately one third of the dietary fibre in vegetables, fruits, legumes and nuts consist of hemicelluloses.

Pectin. Although fruits contain the most pectin, they also represent 15 to 20 percent of the dietary fibre in vegetables, legumes and nuts.

Beta Glucan, a major component of the cell wall material in oats and barley grains but are present in only small quantities in wheat.

Resistant Starch. Legumes are one of the main sources of resistant starch (RS1) as they have thick cell walls that make the starch inaccessible to enzymes. The cooking and processing of foods can disrupt cell walls, making the starch more available for digestion. Banana is a major source of another type of resistant starch (RS2) in the human diet; but as the banana ripens the amount of resistant decreases.

Non-digestible Oligosaccharides in general are highly fermentable while some have so-called prebiotic properties. Onions, chicory and Jerusalem artichokes are the major dietary sources of naturally occurring fructans, from which inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides are obtained.

The more types of fiber that you see on your food’s label, the better it could be for you for type 2 diabetes prevention and management.

(Write the author at wellbeing@mb.com.ph.)

http://mb.com.ph/articles/210703/fibers-health

Glass of wine a day can stave off Alzheimers, study finds

Posted in Diseases/Disabilities, Food/Drinks, Wine by Erineus on July 15, 2009

July 14, 2009, 5:07pm

VIENNA, July 13, 2009 (AFP) – Moderate consumption of wine could reduce the risk of contracting Alzheimer’s disease among those over 75, according to a study revealed at a conference in Vienna.

Excessive consumption, on the other hand, can increase the risk, researchers at Wake Forest University in North Carolina found.

Kaycee Sink, one of the authors of the report, said they monitored 3,069 people of 75 and upwards over six years, asking them to note their alcohol consmption.

Among those who restricted themselves to one or two glasses a day, especially of wine, the risk of Alzheimer’s was reduced by 37 percent.

For those already suffering minor memory problems who drank more than two glasses a day, the risk was twice that of non-drinkers with similar impairment.

Another study released by researchers at a California medical centre for war veterans showed that those who had suffered post-traumatic stress disorder were twice as likely to contract Alzheimer’s than other ex-soldiers.

The study covered 181,093 veterans aged 55 and over, who were monitored between 2001 and 2007.

Characterized by forgetfulness, agitation and dementia, Alzheimer’s is caused by a massive loss of cells in several regions of the brain. The disease occurs most frequently in old age.

An estimated 37 million people worldwide live with dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease causing the majority of cases, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

With the aging of populations, this figure is projected to increase rapidly over the next decades, rising from 7.1 million in 2000 to 16.2 million in 2050 in Europe alone.

The Alzheimer’s Association 2009 international conference in Vienna is attended by some 6,000 scientists, doctors and other experts on the disease. It runs until July 16.

http://mb.com.ph/articles/210916/glass-wine-a-day-can-stave-alzheimers-study-finds